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Check if or check that? Or: Have you tried turning if off and on again?

How often do we read or write that we should check something? Example: "Check if the computer is connected to power." Clear message, no misunderstanding. But what if it says: "Check that the computer is connected to power." more ...

Ten questions for Ines Lasch, intern at parson

Ines Lasch just finished her vocational training as a technical writer and is doing an eight-week internship at parson. We asked her ten questions. more ...

Vocational Training for Technical Communicators. How Does it Work?

Anja Schiel, trainee, and Ulrike Parson, CEO of parson AG, offer their insights into the vocational training for technical communicators. more ...

Make Technical Documentation Intelligent - From Content Management to Content Delivery

In this article, Martin Kreutzer and Ulrike Parson describe how you fill content-delivery portals with intelligent information so that users quickly get the right answers to their questions. more ...

parson's mentoring program

You sent the job application and the interview went well. Now comes your first day at work. Everything is strange: colleagues whose names you immediately forget, business processes, the ERP system. Even the coffee machine doesn't work right away. And where was that meeting room again? more ...

Say it with pictures

What comes to your mind when you see a picture of an umbrella? I think of a typical rainy day in Hamburg. In India, this image could trigger a completely different response  bad memories of the colonial era.

Fotolia Regenschirm© Janis Abolins - Fotolia.com

Images in technical documentation show our readers which button to click, which pane to select, and which cable goes in which socket. With a screenshot or illustration, we can often explain more than with a long, descriptive text.

When we use images in documentation, we have to consider our target audience. Could our readers interpret an image differently, like in the example above? Could the image cause an unwanted reaction?

Images are important for international audiences. It's  not always given that the language of the documentation is also the native language of the reader. Images increase comprehensibility, warn against danger, or help avoid mistakes.

In the new knowledge base article "Visualize information - say it wit pictures", Katrin Mehl and Elisabeth Fischer show how we can create a good and meaningful image, explain the different depiction types, and point out possible obstacles.

 

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